British Universities Film & Video Council

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Geographycal: UK Computer-Assisted Learning Consortium in Geography, Tltp Project

Synopsis
A suite of computer-assisted learning modules and other support materials for student-centred teaching and learning of core topics, concepts and techniques. The modules are groups under the headings human geography (parts 1, 6, 7, 13, 14, 15, 16) physical geography (2, 3, 8, 9, 10, 16) and geographical methods and techniques (4, 5, 11, 12, 18). The modules are intended to reinforce or replace tutorials, support lectures and practicals, or to be used for distance learning and independent study. Each module involves at least one hour of student-computer interaction and can support upwards of three hours of related study.
1: Examines and illustrates selected aspects of the patterns and processes of the geography of recent (post-1970) international economic chang and examines two areas where these processes operate: agriculture and the phenomenon of newly industrialising countries. In three units: industrialisation of agriculture, globalisation process in agriculture, newly industrialised countries.
2: Introduces the dynamic framework of the hydrological cycle, looking at the fundamental concepts underlying catchment processes and drainage basin structure. In 6 units: introduction to catchments; systems framework; the hydrological cycle; the hydrograph; catchment characteristics; hydrograph simulation (effects of different catchment characteristics, canopy processes, overland, sub-surface and channel flow, and precipitation).
3: Allows the investigation of the varioation of air temperature with height in the atmosphere and how, together with wind speed and direction, this affects the dispersion of airborne pollutants from a chimney stack. Uses a simple mathematical model to predict deposition downwind from a stack and to assist the visualisation of the likely deposition from any single source of air pollution. In 12 units under the headings meteorology and air-quality modelling.
4: Introduces project work, focusing on the design, planning and implementaion of selected strategies for both quantitative and qualitative methods of research, which are exemplified and explored through a case study. In ten units under five headings: planning a research project; probability sampling; non-probability sampling; issues in sampling design; shopping centre case study.
5: The theory and practice of map design for paper and computer. Introduces the basic elements of map design, which are reinforced with examples from the wide field of modern map making. Tutorials, exercises and assessment tasks cover composition and layout, choosing symbols, classifying data, scale and generalisation. In 6 units: what are maps?; the art of map design; elements of map design; qualitative maps; quantitative maps; summary.
6: Introduces selected types of social changes, covering the social effects of elements such as migration, debt crises and environmental changes. This is done through case studies of various households in the Caribbean, india/Bangladesh and Mexico, thus demonstrating the interconnectedness of contemporary social change at global and local levels using the household as a framework for analysis. In four units: definition of the ‘household’; the economics of a Caribbean household; the migration of a Bangladeshi household; Mexico: debt crises and the household.
7: Introduces the major dimensions of international development and their representation, highlighting the interrelationships between the different dimensions of inequality and their spatial patterns. Various tools allow the student to explore the conceptual and practical issues of representing inequality in cartographic form through interactive learning opportunities and the manipulation of data and images.
8: Introduces principles of biogeography and ecology by examining in depth the heathland and moorland communities which form an important element of western European and British landscapes. In 5 units: heathlands and moorlands; biogeography; ecology; distribution; management and conservation.
9: Examines change over the Quaternary period in relation to one causal theory and one source of evidence: shows how the Milankovitch theory is related to oxygen-isotope evidence from sea-floor sediments and how that evidence can be interpreted with the aid of mathematical techniques.
10: Explores the processes and causes of slope development under different conditions. With information on the attributes of climate, lithology and initial slope profile for various world locations, simulations of past and future slope developments may be performed for any of the locations. Photographs are included to help students acquire recognition shills.
11: Introduces geographic information systems (GIS) applications, concepts and techniques by means of an interactive game that explores the role of GIS as a decision-making tool. Presents a wide range of concepts underlying the GIS approach and and develops them through a series of case studies examining GIS in various application areas.
12: Examines the nature and characteristics of geographical resources and covers the means and mechanisms for assessing a range of data sources. This is achieved by simulating searchs of the Internet for electronic materials and constructing decision trees for the acquisition and elaboration of other data.
13: Shows the impact of planning on urban and rural development. Includes examples from both the developed and the developing world an demonstrates contrasts between the form and process of urban and rural development. Students are introduced to evaluations of change in urban and rural areas and to the management of these changes.
14: Introduces regional and local differences using two approaches: students role play to explore employment opportunities in different regions of the UK. Students use land-use maps and the results of shift share analysis to compare three example regions. Also includes training in the use of shift share analysis.
15: Focuses on the environmental hazard of flooding. Students assume a role in the management of a flood and are allocated a budget which is used to purchase information from a database. Uses the 1993 Chichester flood as a case study for which appropriate management strageties have to be devised.
16: Introduces the major landscape features associated with plate movement, dealing with the causes of earthquakes and investigating their contemporary spatial patterns of occurrence. In 3 units: the break-up of Pangaea; introduction to global tectonics; contemporary seismic activity.
Language
English
Country
Great Britain
Medium
Multimedia; Computer program. Floppy disk. PC Windows version only
Year of production
1995-96
Availability
Sale
Notes
Available to UK higher education institutions.
Unit 8 discussed by John McKeown in ‘Life Sciences Education Computing’, Vol 7, No 2 (Oct 1996), p9.
Documentation
Accompanying documentation for each module.
Uses
Introductory geography for BA, BSc and Social Science degree courses.
Subjects
Geography
Keywords
economic geography; ecosystems; floods; geographic information systems; geography teaching; human geography; maps and mapping; plate tectonics; social conditions; town & regional planning

Distribution Formats

Type
CD-ROM

Sections

Title
International economic change
Synopsis
1: Examines and illustrates selected aspects of the patterns and processes of the geography of recent (post-1970) international economic chang and examines two areas where these processes operate: agriculture and the phenomenon of newly industrialising co

Title
Catchment systems
Synopsis
2: Introduces the dynamic framework of the hydrological cycle, looking at the fundamental concepts underlying catchment processes and drainage basin structure. In 6 units: introduction to catchments; systems framework; the hydrological cycle; the hydrogra

Title
Weather and air quality
Synopsis
3: Allows the investigation of the varioation of air temperature with height in the atmosphere and how, together with wind speed and direction, this affects the dispersion of airborne pollutants from a chimney stack. Uses a simple mathematical model to pr

Title
Social survey design
Synopsis
4: Introduces project work, focusing on the design, planning and implementaion of selected strategies for both quantitative and qualitative methods of research, which are exemplified and explored through a case study. In ten units under five headings: pla

Title
Map design
Synopsis
5: The theory and practice of map design for paper and computer. Introduces the basic elements of map design, which are reinforced with examples from the wide field of modern map making. Tutorials, exercises and assessment tasks cover composition and layo

Title
Social change at the international scale
Synopsis
6: Introduces selected types of social changes, covering the social effects of elements such as migration, debt crises and environmental changes. This is done through case studies of various households in the Caribbean, india/Bangladesh and Mexico, thus d

Title
International inequalities
Synopsis
7: Introduces the major dimensions of international development and their representation, highlighting the interrelationships between the different dimensions of inequality and their spatial patterns. Various tools allow the student to explore the concept

Title
Biogeography and ecology
Synopsis
8: Introduces principles of biogeography and ecology by examining in depth the heathland and moorland communities which form an important element of western European and British landscapes. In 5 units: heathlands and moorlands; biogeography; ecology; dist

Title
Introduction to Quaternary palaeogeography
Synopsis
9: Examines change over the Quaternary period in relation to one causal theory and one source of evidence: shows how the Milankovitch theory is related to oxygen-isotope evidence from sea-floor sediments and how that evidence can be interpreted with the a

Title
Slope development
Synopsis
10: Explores the processes and causes of slope development under different conditions. With information on the attributes of climate, lithology and initial slope profile for various world locations, simulations of past and future slope developments may be

Title
Introduction to GIS 1
Synopsis
11: Introduces geographic information systems (GIS) applications, concepts and techniques by means of an interactive game that explores the role of GIS as a decision-making tool. Presents a wide range of concepts underlying the GIS approach and and develo

Title
Making sense of information
Synopsis
12: Examines the nature and characteristics of geographical resources and covers the means and mechanisms for assessing a range of data sources. This is achieved by simulating searchs of the Internet for electronic materials and constructing decision tree

Title
Urban and rural change
Synopsis
13: Shows the impact of planning on urban and rural development. Includes examples from both the developed and the developing world an demonstrates contrasts between the form and process of urban and rural development. Students are introduced to evaluatio

Title
Economic change at a local scale
Synopsis
14: Introduces regional and local differences using two approaches: students role play to explore employment opportunities in different regions of the UK. Students use land-use maps and the results of shift share analysis to compare three example regions.

Title
Environmental hazards
Synopsis
15: Focuses on the environmental hazard of flooding. Students assume a role in the management of a flood and are allocated a budget which is used to purchase information from a database. Uses the 1993 Chichester flood as a case study for which appropriate

Title
Global tectonics
Synopsis
16: Introduces the major landscape features associated with plate movement, dealing with the causes of earthquakes and investigating their contemporary spatial patterns of occurrence. In 3 units: the break-up of Pangaea; introduction to global tectonics;

Title
Population and resources

Title
Philosophy

Distributor

Name

Cheltenham and Gloucester College

Email
mhealeyAchelt.ac.uk
Phone
01242 543364
Fax
01242 543959
Address
Department of Geography and Geology
Francis Close Hall
Swindon Road
Cheltenham
GL50 4AZ
Notes
contact: Professor Mick Healey
Name

University of Leicester

Email
CTI@le.ac.uk
Web
http://www.geog.le.ac.uk/cti/ External site opens in new window
Phone
0116-252 3827
Address
Deprtment of Geography
University Road
Leicester
LE1 7RH
Notes
Contact: John Castleford (project co-director) (tel 0116 252 3827)

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